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News New wiki article posted on estimating reservoir capacity and volume based on water level

Gary Lucas

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Joined
Oct 21, 2018
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I’ve just posted an informal wiki article about an algorithm for computing a reservoir’s capacity and changing water volume as a function of water level. The computation is based on using Constrained Delaunay Triangulation techniques. This wiki article is a follow up to one I announced on this forum last fall. The previous article dealt with a simpler calculation for overall volume assuming a fixed water level, but the new article deals with variable water levels. It also talks about improvements to the handling of data for near-shore areas and covers some interesting work that was done by the Texas Water Development Board’s Hydrographic Survey Program.

You can find the article at https://github.com/gwlucastrig/Tinfour/wiki/Using-the-Delaunay-to-Create-a-Reservoir-Volume-Model

Although the website where it’s posted is really focused on software development rather than GIS per se, I think the article is general enough that it would appeal to anyone in the geospatial community who is interested in information on Delaunay-based estimation techniques.

The article also introduces a Java application called Simple Volumetric Model (SVM) for performing the computations it describes.
 
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Gary Lucas

gO Newbie
Joined
Oct 21, 2018
Messages
6
I've updated the software for the Simple Volumetric Model (SVM) that I announced last month. The model now provides more detailed results and improved processing performance. Additionally, the website now includes more documentation and "how to" information.

I am also looking for additional sources of data that I can use to exercise and test my software. The Simple Volumetric Model (SVM) reads Shapefiles giving bathymetry (soundings) data and digitized shorelines (boundaries) for closed bodies of water (lakes, reservoirs, etc.) and computes volume and surface area as a function of water level. A picture of a typical analysis output is shown below. Although the SVM is not a professional-grade hydrography tool (it's called "simple" for a reason), it does a fairly decent job. If you have some data that you'd like to have analyzed and you are interested in seeing what the SVM makes of it, let me know.

You can read more about the SVM at https://github.com/gwlucastrig/Tinfour/wiki/Using-the-Simple-Volumetric-Model


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The image above was created using data from the Oklahoma Water Resource Board [OWRB]. (2016). Lake of the Arbuckles, Collected Bathymetric Survey Points. Accessed July, 2019 from https://www.owrb.ok.gov/studies/surface/bathymetry.php
 
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